Backing Scotland’s Currency — Foreign exchange reserves for an Independent Scotland

Common Weal has published a new white paper, “Backing Scotland’s Currency — Foreign exchange reserves for an Independent Scotland”, authored by Peter Ryan. From the preface:

The successful management of an independent country’s currency is often tied to its ability to raise and maintain an adequate level of foreign currency reserves. These reserves would be used to stabilise the currency’s exchange rate, protect against speculative attacks on the currency and service debt obligations, amongst other uses. In the case of Scottish independence, it will be important to show that sufficient reserves can be established quickly enough after the launch of a new currency to ensure its stability. It is the purpose of this paper to demonstrate that this proposal is viable.

Ryan reckons that approximately $40 billion (20% of GDP) could be raised to support an independent Scottish currency. Denmark similarly holds in the region of 20% of GDP in foreign exchange reserves1. He estimates that the costs of servicing the debt would be around $70.2 million annually, which is “substantially less than the current annual contribution by Scotland to the UK’s foreign reserves (£500 million per year) which are being built up by the UK government to bail out the City of London in the event of another crash.”

From The National’s reporting of the paper:

Dr Jim Walker, chief economist of Asianomics, said while it was “absolutely correct” that an independent Scotland could raise $40bn in foreign reserves, it was also “absolutely unnecessary”. He described the Common Weal report as a “well-thought-out contribution”, but said many successful independent countries had levels of reserves considerably smaller than 20 per cent of GDP.

“The Czech Republic, until the last two years, had historically a substantial current account deficit making the currency much more vulnerable,” he said. “For Bulgaria that was also historically true but not in the last decade. However, these reserve levels [at 40 per cent GDP] are a result of past deficits. Scotland would run a large surplus.

“Two ‘small’ non-European players with open capital accounts and free-floating currencies, Australia and New Zealand, maintained reserves of 4.5 per cent of GDP and 10 per cent of GDP, respectively, for 2016.

“There is absolutely no need [for an independent Scotland] to be aiming at a 20 per cent of GDP reserve level.”

Peter Ryan’s previous paper, “How to make a Currency — A Practical Guide”, may also be of interest.